INDIAN BARBERRY, Berberis aristata

INDIAN BARBERRY

Latin name:          Berberis aristata

English name: Tree Turmeric, Indian Barberry, and Ophthalmic Barberry

Sanskrit name: Daruharidra

Indian name: Daru haldi, Rasuant

Medicinal parts used: Bark, Fruit, Root, Stem and Wood

Berberis aristata is an erect, glabrous, spinescent shrub with obovate to elliptic, subacute to obtuse, entire or toothed leaves. The flowers are yellow and in corymbose racemes. The fruits are oblong-ovoid or ovoid, bright red berries.

The plant is native of the whole range of Himalaya Mountains at an elevation 2000 to 3500 meters. It also occurs in Nilagiri range in Southern India. The shrub grows up to 1.5 – 2.0 meters in height, with a thick woody root covered with a thin brittle bark. The leaves are cylindrical, straight, tapering, very sharp, hard, smooth spines. The flowers yellow, numerous, stalked, arranged in drooping racemes. The fruit is a small berry, ovoid and smooth.
The alkaloids in the bark and root bark of Berberis aristata are berberine, berbamine, aromoline, karachine, palmatine, oxyacanthine and oxyberberine.

Therapeutic use:

  • It is mainly used in eye diseases, haemorrhoids, amenorrhoea, leucorrhoea, piles, sores, peptic ulcers, dysentery, heartburn, indigestion, hepatitis, intermittent fever, and chronic ophthalmia.
  • An infusion of root is useful in treatment of malaria, skin diseases, diarrhea and jaundice.
  • A decoction is used as mouthwash for treating swollen gums and toothache.
  • It is also used to treat infections, eczema, parasites, psoriasis, and vaginitis.
  • Roots are hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory and stimulate the cardiovascular system.
  • Root bark is anticoagulant and hypotensive in nature.
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One response to this post.

  1. Posted by karuna on June 22, 2011 at 5:43 pm

    Can I use these leaves extract or extract from seeds in preparation of Kashmir kajal/

    Reply

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