MANJISTHA, Rubia cordifolia

MANJISTHA

Latin name: Rubia cordifolia

English name: Indian madder

Sanskrit name: Manjistha, Samanga

Indian name: Manjith, Majith

Medicinal parts used: Root

Rubia cordifolia is a perennial, herbaceous climber, roots long, cylindrical, flexuose, with a thin red bark. The stems are often many yards long, rough, grooved, becoming slightly woody at the base, bark white, petioles quadrangular, sometimes prickly on the angles, glabrous and shining. Fruits are 4-6 mm, didymous or globose, smooth, shining and purplish black when ripe.

It is a common medicinal plant used in the preparation of different formulations in Ayurveda. It is useful in alleviating Kapha and Pitta doshas. The root of the plant is commonly known as Manjistha and its dried samples are sold in the market under the name Manjith. The roots of the plant are sweet, bitter, acrid and of high medicinal value. Manjistha is found in Himalayas and other hill stations of India.

Therapeutic use:

  • In Ayurveda, it is used in treating skin disorders of many varieties, menstrual disorders (excessive or painful bleeding), renal stones, urinary disorders, blood detoxification.
  • It is used as an immune regulator. Its role in supporting heart health is evidenced by studies that show that it regulates blood pressure, blood vessel constriction and the tendency of blood to form clots.
  • The other diseases that are treated with the help of this herb include diarrhoea, dyspepsia, anorexia, menstrual problems, chronic fever, urinary infections, cancer, heart diseases, joint pains, kidney stones, dysurea, skin diseases like eczema, acne, herpes, psoriasis, dermatitis and in cleaning the uterus after delivery.
  • The ayurvedic herb is also useful in cleansing liver, pancreas, spleen and kidneys. It removes skin discoloration and freckles.
  • It is anti-inflammatory and is useful in healing wounds. It is helpful in treating skin diseases, in blood purification, increasing appetite and in stimulation and contraction of uterus.
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