MOLYBDENUM

 

High quality vitamins, minerals, herbal, amino acids, diabetessupplements,
high-blood pressure, weight-loss, laxative, enzymes, supplements at a discount price.
Available to International customers.

TO ORDER, VISIT
http://www.bestnutrition.com
http://www.nutritionbest.com

MOLYBDENUM

DESCRIPTION

Molybdenum is a trace mineral, the dietary importance of which is only beginning to be known. Its presence in the diet depends mainly on the soil in which vegetables and other edible produce are grown. When plants are grown in molybdenum-poor soil, they lack that essential mineral. An example of this was observed in Lin Xian, in China’s Hunan Province, where there was an extraordinarily high incidence of esophageal carcinoma occurring over many generations. When molybdenum was added to the soil, the rate of this deadly disease declined. It is speculated that the cancer was not caused by molybdenum deficiency. Rather, nitrosamines produced in the food were not being metabolized properly due to a deficiency in the plants’ root systems of the molybdenum-requiring enzyme, nitrate reductase. The nitrosamines were felt to be the direct cause of the cancer.

Nitrates and nitrites are found in various lunch meats and sausages. Consumption of them can lead to the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines in the stomach. In addition to vitamin C, supplemental molybdenum can help reduce nitrosamine levels. Unless one is confident that he or she is eating plenty of produce grown in molybdenum-rich soil, taking a mineral supplement containing this essential trace element is highly advisable. Soil deficiencies of molybdenum are widespread and common, and processing of flour and sugar eliminate it completely.

Molybdenum is required for correct function of xanthine oxidase, an enzyme responsible for iron metabolism.  It is required for the production of uric acid, a waste product found in the blood and urine.  Molybdenum helps to detoxify excess copper and helps ensure normal sexual function in men.

DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS

As mentioned above, lack of molybdenum may appear as male sexual dysfunction.

 

those Who may need to supplement

•     individuals with proven molybdenum deficiency

•     those with excess blood copper levels

 

REQUIRED NUTRITIONAL INTAKE

The COMA report does not set a required nutritional intake for molybdenum, but states that a safe intake is “between 50 mcg and 400 mcg.”

Best food sources

Food Molybdenum (mcg/100g)

canned beans……………………………………………. 350

wheat germ……………………………………………….. 200

liver……………………………………………………………. 200

lentils…………………………………………………………. 120

sunflower seeds………………………………………… 103

kidney beans………………………………………………   75

green beans………………………………………………..   66

macaroni…………………………………………………….   51

eggs……………………………………………………………..   50

rice………………………………………………………………   47

noodles……………………………………………………….   45

chicken……………………………………………………….   40

bread, whole-meal…………………………………….   26

potatoes………………………………………………………   25

shell fish……………………………………………………..   20

apricots……………………………………………………….   14

 

SAFETY

Oversupply of molybdenum can lead to toxicity, so its consumption should be kept within the range of 150-500 mcg for adults and 50-300 mcg for children.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: